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Quotes

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““Understand Nature, then copy Nature,” was [Viktor] Schauberger's motto.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 196.



“Incidents such as this taught Schauberger that water needs to be cool––about 4C [celsius]––even as it bubbles out of the ground. Without a shaded exit, he found, water will not “grow” to a great height underground and emerge as the mountaintop spring. As well as temperature, time spent maturing in underground rocks provides minerals which help make water spark with energy.


Schauberger noticed beautiful vegetation growing around natural springs––an indication of “mature” mineralized energetically–charged water. These concepts, of water having qualities such as strength and maturity, were not found in any textbooks or lecture notes. The brash forester later told hydrologists to abandon their microscopes and testing laboratories, and instead study water holistically in its environment. He found natural watercourses to be alive with inherent intelligence, and not to be mere movements of a chemical substance.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 194.



“Regardless of his bitter battles with the scientific community, Schauberger believed in the scientific method. He experimented on liquids and gases in a small laboratory he set up. His aim however, was to develop a science which actually worked [on principles opposite to the orthodox viewpoint]. “Humanity has committed a great crime by ignoring the use of cycloidal motion of water,” he said. For example, the current water–pumping devices were not only uneconomical, he said, “they cause water to degenerate by depriving it of its biological values.”


Attempts to explain connections between cycloidal motion and levitation to a scientist are useless, Schauberger said bitterly. Nor are world leaders any help “because they lean on the ignorance of the masses, including the scientists, as well as … current physical laws, to safeguard their vested interestes and positions.”


Conventional energy conversion––burning of fossil fuels or atom–splitting––turns order into chaos. Schauberger proposed processes which would add order and energy to substances such as water, instead of destroying it, while generating useful electric power.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 199.



“The electrostatic charges ‘carried around’ are currents between atoms and the ether, which produce magnetism. The phenomena of ‘permanent magnetism’ or ‘cosmically induced’ magnetism are apparently due to electrostatic charges ‘carried around’ by cosmic molecular motion, in the universal ether field. Since no one can hold atoms, electrons or molecules perfectly still—because they are in fantastic motion—all atoms and molecules carry currents producing magnetic fields. Since a magnetic field is the product of a current, no one can produce a magnetic field without electricity, moving through or along a conductor, or as electrostatic charges in local or cosmic motion.”

–William Lyne. Occult Ether Physics: Tesla's “Ideal Flying Machine” and the Conspiracy to Conceal It. 3rd Revised Edition. Creatopia™: Lamy, New Mexico, 2010, Pages 12, 78.



Furthermore, Nikola Tesla's Dynamic Theory of Gravity declares that the electromagnetic force production phenomenon is the most important in the Universe. “He stated that mechanical motions are universally a result of the electromagnetic force acting upon and through media. Tesla's idea was that gravity is the result of displacement of two polarized dielectrics, the aether from the outside and the mass from the inside of a planet. The gravity force comes from the outside as a push of the aether and not as a pull from the center of the mass.”

–Jovan Marjanovic. Basic Principles of Over Unity Electromagnetic Machines: A Scientific View into the World of Free Energy from Electric Charges and Magnetic Fields. First Edition. Veljko Milkovic Research & Development Center: Novi Sad, Serbia, 2011. ISBN# 978–86–88–88301–6. Page 67.



“Education is an admirable thing. But it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.”

–Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde in A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over–Educated (1894)/First published anonymously in the Saturday Review (17 November 1894); Source: Wikiquote page on Oscar Wilde; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Then said a teacher, Speak to us of teaching.


And he said:


No man can reveal to you aught but that which already lies half asleep in the dawning of your knowledge.


The teacher who walks in the shadow of the temple, among his followers, gives not of his wisdom but rather of his faith and his lovingness.


If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of his wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind. …”

–Kahlil Gibran, in The Prophet, as quoted in To Educate With Love by Dr. Herbert (Herb) M. Greenberg



“I know that most men — not only those considered clever, but even those who are very clever and capable of understanding most difficult scientific, mathematical, or philosophic, problems — can seldom discern even the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as obliges them to admit the falsity of conclusions they have formed, perhaps with much difficulty — conclusions of which they are proud, which they have taught to others, and on which they have built their lives.”

–Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy (Leo Tolstoy), from the Opening to Ch 14. Translation from: What Is Art and Essays on Art (Oxford University Press, 1930, trans. Aylmer Maude); Source: Wikiquote page on Leo Tolstoy; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existence. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery each day. Never lose a holy curiosity. … Don't stop to marvel.”

–Albert Einstein statement to William Miller, as quoted in LIFE magazine (2 May 1955) “Old Man's Advice to Youth: “Never Lose a Holy Curiosity”” pages 61–64, at page 64; Source: Wikiquote page on Albert Einstein; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

–Albert Einstein in “What Life Means to Einstein: An Interview by George Sylvester Viereck” The Saturday Evening Post (26 October 1929), p. 17; Source: Wikiquote page on Albert Einstein; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Our school systems are all nonsynergetic. We take the whole child and fractionate the scope of his or her comprehending coordination by putting the children in elementary schools—to become preoccupied with elements or isolated facts only. Thereafter we force them to choose some specialization, forcing them to forget the whole. … We may well ask how it happened that the entire scheme of advanced education is devoted exclusively to ever narrower specialization. We find that the historical beginnings of schools and tutoring were established, and economically supported by illiterate and vastly ambitious warlords who required a wide variety of brain slaves with which to logistically and ballistically overwhelm those who opposed their expansion of physical conquest. They also simultaneously DIVIDED and CONQUERED any and all “bright ones” who might otherwise rise within their realms to threaten their supremacy. The warlord vitiated their threat by making them all specialists and reserving to himself exclusively the right to think about and act comprehensively. The warlord made all those about him differentiators and reserved the function of integration to himself.”

–Richard Buckminster Fuller during R. Buckminster Fuller's Presentation to U.S. Congressional Sub–Committee on World Game 4 March 1969, p. 15; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Up to the Twentieth Century, reality was everything humans could touch, smell, see, and hear. Since the initial publication of the chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, humans have learned that what they can touch, smell, see, and hear is less than one–millionth of reality. Ninety–nine percent of all that is going to affect our tomorrows is being developed by humans using instruments and working in ranges of reality that are nonhumanly sensible.”

–From R. Buckminster Fuller on Education (University of Massachusetts Press, 1979), p. 130; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“There is more recognition now that things are changing, but not because there is a political move to do it. It is simply a result of the information being there. Our survival won't depend on political or economic systems. It's going to depend on the courage of the individual to speak the truth, and to speak it lovingly and not destructively. It's saying what you really know and feel is the truth, in all directions. Our greatest vulnerability lies in the amount of misinformation and misconditioning of humanity. I've found the educations systems are full of it. You have to examine each word and ask yourself, “Is that the right word for that?” — the integrity and the courage of the individual to speak his own truth and not to go along with the crowd, yet not making others seem ignorant. After a while, if enough human beings are doing it, then everybody will start going in the right direction.”

–From “Norie Huddle Interview with Buckminster Fuller — Spring 1981” at Golden Butterfly Productions; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“In spite of all humans' innate interest in the interrelatedness of all experience, long ago these world–power–structure builders learned to shunt all the bright intellectuals and the physically creative into specialist careers. The powerful reserved for themselves the far easier, because innate, comprehensive functioning. All one needs to do is to discover how self–perpetuating is this disease of specialization is to witness the inter–departmental battling for educational funds and the concomitant jealous guarding of the various specializations assigned to a department's salaried experts on each subject in any university.”

–From Cosmography: A Posthumous Scenario for the Future of Humanity (1992); Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”

–As quoted in Beyond Civilization: Humanity's Next Great Adventure (1999), by Daniel Quinn, p. 137; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius—and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.”

–Ernst Friedrich “Fritz” Schumacher, from “Small is Beautiful”, an essay, in The Radical Humanist, Vol. 37, No. 5 (August 1973), p. 22; Source: Wikiquote page on E. F. Schumacher; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Eco–Effective Design as Design for Sustainability”


“We would like to suggest a new design assignment. Instead of fine–tuning the existing destructive framework, why don't people and industries set out to create the following:

–From Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things by William McDonough and Michael Braungart. New York City, New York: North Point Press, 2002. ISBN# 978–0–86547–587–8. Page 90–91.



“I know that most men — not only those considered clever, but even those who are very clever and capable of understanding most difficult scientific, mathematical, or philosophic, problems — can seldom discern even the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as obliges them to admit the falsity of conclusions they have formed, perhaps with much difficulty — conclusions of which they are proud, which they have taught to others, and on which they have built their lives.”

–Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy (Leo Tolstoy), from the Opening to Ch 14. Translation from: What Is Art and Essays on Art (Oxford University Press, 1930, trans. Aylmer Maude); Source: Wikiquote page on Leo Tolstoy; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“The history of science shows that the progress of science has constantly been hampered by the tyrannical influence of certain conceptions that finally came to be considered as dogma. For this reason, it is proper to submit periodically to a very searching examination, principles that we have come to assume without any more discussion.”

–From Will Quantum Physics Remain Indeterministic, in Louis de Broglie (1953). The revolution in physics: a non–mathematical survey of quanta. Noonday Press. p. 237.; Source: Wikiquote page on Louis de Broglie; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Up to the Twentieth Century, reality was everything humans could touch, smell, see, and hear. Since the initial publication of the chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, humans have learned that what they can touch, smell, see, and hear is less than one–millionth of reality. Ninety–nine percent of all that is going to affect our tomorrows is being developed by humans using instruments and working in ranges of reality that are nonhumanly sensible.”

–From R. Buckminster Fuller on Education (University of Massachusetts Press, 1979), p. 130; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“A human being is a part of the whole, called by us “Universe,” a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. The striving to free oneself from this delusion is the one issue of true religion. Not to nourish it but to try to overcome it is the way to reach the attainable measure of peace of mind.”

The New Quotable Einstein by Alice Calaprice (Princeton University Press, 2005: ISBN 0691120749), p. 206, has a different and presumably more accurate version of this letter, which she dates to February 12, 1950 and describes as “a letter to a distraught father who had lost his young son and had asked Einstein for some comforting words”.; Source: Wikiquote page on Albert Einstein; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)

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““Understand Nature, then copy Nature,” was [Viktor] Schauberger's motto.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 196.



“Incidents such as this taught Schauberger that water needs to be cool––about 4C [celsius]––even as it bubbles out of the ground. Without a shaded exit, he found, water will not “grow” to a great height underground and emerge as the mountaintop spring. As well as temperature, time spent maturing in underground rocks provides minerals which help make water spark with energy.


Schauberger noticed beautiful vegetation growing around natural springs––an indication of “mature” mineralized energetically–charged water. These concepts, of water having qualities such as strength and maturity, were not found in any textbooks or lecture notes. The brash forester later told hydrologists to abandon their microscopes and testing laboratories, and instead study water holistically in its environment. He found natural watercourses to be alive with inherent intelligence, and not to be mere movements of a chemical substance.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 194.



“Regardless of his bitter battles with the scientific community, Schauberger believed in the scientific method. He experimented on liquids and gases in a small laboratory he set up. His aim however, was to develop a science which actually worked [on principles opposite to the orthodox viewpoint]. “Humanity has committed a great crime by ignoring the use of cycloidal motion of water,” he said. For example, the current water–pumping devices were not only uneconomical, he said, “they cause water to degenerate by depriving it of its biological values.”


Attempts to explain connections between cycloidal motion and levitation to a scientist are useless, Schauberger said bitterly. Nor are world leaders any help “because they lean on the ignorance of the masses, including the scientists, as well as … current physical laws, to safeguard their vested interestes and positions.”


Conventional energy conversion––burning of fossil fuels or atom–splitting––turns order into chaos. Schauberger proposed processes which would add order and energy to substances such as water, instead of destroying it, while generating useful electric power.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 199.



“The work was based on Schauberger's discovery of how to develop a low–pressure zone at the atomic level. This had happened in seconds when his laboratory device whirled air or water “radially and axially” at a falling temperature. He referred to the resulting force as diamagnetic levitation power. He emphasized that nature uses indirect—what Schauberger called reactionary—suction force.


He insisted that the technical team from the concentration camp be treated as free me would. After their research headquarters was bombed, they were transferred to Leonstein and started a flying disc project to be powered with his trout–inspired turbine which rotated air into a twisting type of oscillation resulting in a buildup of immense power causing levitation. A small model which crashed against the ceiling glowed blue–green at first as it rose, then trailed a silvery glow.


According to researcher Norbert Harthun, his devices were no more than laboratory models by the end of the War. However, the American military officers who showed up a few days after the model hit the ceiling seemed to know what he was doing. They seized everything. He was interrogated by a high–ranking officer, and put in “protective custody” for six months. The officers also heavily questioned his helpers. Russian members of the team later returned to the Soviet Union.


Alexandersson's book quotes a letter from Schauberger saying he was confined by the occupying forces for nearly a year because of his knowledge of atomic energy (even though his research was directed toward implosion—which was labelled fusion—rather than toward the destructive fission approach to the atom).”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Pages 200–201.



“Bitter about the effects of both the chemical industry and deforestation upon agriculture, he stated, “The farmers work hand–in–hand with our foresters. The blood of the earth continuously weakens, and the productivity of the soil decreases.”


When forests can no longer nurture water sources which supply vitality, then farmland downstream cannot build up a voltage in the ground which is necessary for keeping parasitic bacteria in balance, he observed. Noticing that soil dried out after being ploughed with iron ploughs, he built copper–plated ploughs. The ploughs successfully increased crops, but the greed of special–interest groups stopped the venture.”

–“The Burial of Living Technology” by Jeane Manning, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Pages 201–202.



“The electrostatic charges ‘carried around’ are currents between atoms and the ether, which produce magnetism. The phenomena of ‘permanent magnetism’ or ‘cosmically induced’ magnetism are apparently due to electrostatic charges ‘carried around’ by cosmic molecular motion, in the universal ether field. Since no one can hold atoms, electrons or molecules perfectly still—because they are in fantastic motion—all atoms and molecules carry currents producing magnetic fields. Since a magnetic field is the product of a current, no one can produce a magnetic field without electricity, moving through or along a conductor, or as electrostatic charges in local or cosmic motion.”

–William Lyne. Occult Ether Physics: Tesla's “Ideal Flying Machine” and the Conspiracy to Conceal It. 3rd Revised Edition. Creatopia™: Lamy, New Mexico, 2010, Pages 12, 78.



Furthermore, Nikola Tesla's Dynamic Theory of Gravity declares that the electromagnetic force production phenomenon is the most important in the Universe. “He stated that mechanical motions are universally a result of the electromagnetic force acting upon and through media. Tesla's idea was that gravity is the result of displacement of two polarized dielectrics, the aether from the outside and the mass from the inside of a planet. The gravity force comes from the outside as a push of the aether and not as a pull from the center of the mass.”

–Jovan Marjanovic. Basic Principles of Over Unity Electromagnetic Machines: A Scientific View into the World of Free Energy from Electric Charges and Magnetic Fields. First Edition. Veljko Milkovic Research & Development Center: Novi Sad, Serbia, 2011. ISBN# 978–86–88–88301–6. Page 67.



“Spitsbergen[, Norway] is nearly 79 degrees north; yet fossil flowers and corals and beds of coal thirty feet thick have been found. Antarctica is known to have seams of coal at a latitude of 85 degrees. For this coal to have formed, the polar regions must have had great forests in the past. How can relatively recent and sudden changes in the Earth's climate and simultaneous wide–spread destruction of plant and animal species be explained?”

–Excerpt of “Egyptian History and Cosmic Catastrophe: The Ideas of Dr. Immanuel Velikovsky” by “Gerard”, which appeared in Suppressed Inventions & Other Discoveries: Revealing the World's Greatest Secrets of Science and Medicine by Jonathan Eisen. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group, 1999. ISBN# 0–89529–809–0. Page 211



“Education is an admirable thing. But it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.”

–Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde in A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over–Educated (1894)/First published anonymously in the Saturday Review (17 November 1894); Source: Wikiquote page on Oscar Wilde; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Then said a teacher, Speak to us of teaching.


And he said:


No man can reveal to you aught but that which already lies half asleep in the dawning of your knowledge.


The teacher who walks in the shadow of the temple, among his followers, gives not of his wisdom but rather of his faith and his lovingness.


If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of his wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind. …”

–Kahlil Gibran, in The Prophet, as quoted in To Educate With Love by Dr. Herbert (Herb) M. Greenberg



“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existence. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery each day. Never lose a holy curiosity. … Don't stop to marvel.”

–Albert Einstein statement to William Miller, as quoted in LIFE magazine (2 May 1955) “Old Man's Advice to Youth: “Never Lose a Holy Curiosity”” pages 61–64, at page 64; Source: Wikiquote page on Albert Einstein; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

–Albert Einstein in “What Life Means to Einstein: An Interview by George Sylvester Viereck” The Saturday Evening Post (26 October 1929), p. 17; Source: Wikiquote page on Albert Einstein; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“Our school systems are all nonsynergetic. We take the whole child and fractionate the scope of his or her comprehending coordination by putting the children in elementary schools—to become preoccupied with elements or isolated facts only. Thereafter we force them to choose some specialization, forcing them to forget the whole. … We may well ask how it happened that the entire scheme of advanced education is devoted exclusively to ever narrower specialization. We find that the historical beginnings of schools and tutoring were established, and economically supported by illiterate and vastly ambitious warlords who required a wide variety of brain slaves with which to logistically and ballistically overwhelm those who opposed their expansion of physical conquest. They also simultaneously DIVIDED and CONQUERED any and all “bright ones” who might otherwise rise within their realms to threaten their supremacy. The warlord vitiated their threat by making them all specialists and reserving to himself exclusively the right to think about and act comprehensively. The warlord made all those about him differentiators and reserved the function of integration to himself.”

–Richard Buckminster Fuller during R. Buckminster Fuller's Presentation to U.S. Congressional Sub–Committee on World Game 4 March 1969, p. 15; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“There is more recognition now that things are changing, but not because there is a political move to do it. It is simply a result of the information being there. Our survival won't depend on political or economic systems. It's going to depend on the courage of the individual to speak the truth, and to speak it lovingly and not destructively. It's saying what you really know and feel is the truth, in all directions. Our greatest vulnerability lies in the amount of misinformation and misconditioning of humanity. I've found the educations systems are full of it. You have to examine each word and ask yourself, “Is that the right word for that?” — the integrity and the courage of the individual to speak his own truth and not to go along with the crowd, yet not making others seem ignorant. After a while, if enough human beings are doing it, then everybody will start going in the right direction.”

–From “Norie Huddle Interview with Buckminster Fuller — Spring 1981” at Golden Butterfly Productions; Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)



“In spite of all humans' innate interest in the interrelatedness of all experience, long ago these world–power–structure builders learned to shunt all the bright intellectuals and the physically creative into specialist careers. The powerful reserved for themselves the far easier, because innate, comprehensive functioning. All one needs to do is to discover how self–perpetuating is this disease of specialization is to witness the inter–departmental battling for educational funds and the concomitant jealous guarding of the various specializations assigned to a department's salaried experts on each subject in any university.”

–From Cosmography: A Posthumous Scenario for the Future of Humanity (1992); Source: Wikiquote page on Buckminster Fuller; License: Attribution–ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY–SA 3.0)